Prioritizing for each day, as part of a daily practice, is a bit different than prioritizing strategic objectives. The differences show up in primarily three ways:

1) although you do have at least one strategic objective in mind, you are prioritizing for only one day;

2) it’s just you performing this prioritization; and

3) you only have a few minutes to prioritize before moving on.

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Leadership, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , ,
Leaders model the way of leadership for others. Those who exhibit a high EQ—emotional quotient—typically are better communicators. They speak and behave in ways that show that they truly want those hearing their message to understand it and feel included.

EQ is the measurement of Emotional Intelligence (whereas IQ is a measure for general intellect). People high in EQ are exceptional at being aware of emotions—theirs and others. They also have a keen ability to manage their own emotions and influence the emotional state of others.

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Leadership, Measurement, Transformation & Strategy   , , ,
You’re still considering your day. In Part II you focused on “what” you want. In Part III you then considered that “what” and focused on “who” can help you and who might you serve.

Now you are homing in on “how,” and more specifically, “How will what you do today address “what” you want and “who” can help or who you can serve?” What’s the reality of today? What can you do to make sure that the steps you take today are the best steps possible for a better future?

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Leadership, Productivity - Do the right things right, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , , ,
Mountains fading into the horizon; Text focusing on question #2, Who?
You’re considering your day. How do you ensure that each day achieves or moves you closer to what you want? Are you among the right people? Are you asking for help?

You may plan your days many days or weeks in advance, such as to block out times for important meetings, events, or trips. I do this, and I also block out writing time each week. The daily practice of considering each day, the night prior, the morning of, or both (I do both), is still important. Critical even. It’s shorter-term, more tactical “best next steps” and—I think you’ll find this to be most important—strategically positioning your mind to make the day the best it can be.

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Leadership, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , , , ,
Sunset image with text, "What do you want?"

Before you can focus on what matters most, first define what matters! What do you want?

Your calendar is full. You feel busy. Yet is any part of what you have planned for today moving you toward a better future? As a leader, is what you have planned for today moving the organization toward a better future?

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Leadership, Productivity - Do the right things right, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , , , ,
focus on what matters spelled on scrabble tiles

Being productive is a goal for many. Being productive while focusing on what matters most is what will bring you the greatest success.

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Leadership, Productivity - Do the right things right, Transformation & Strategy   , ,

Let’s address remote work.

Recently I had the pleasure of being interviewed by Dr. Ginny Bianco-Mathis (and Mitch Simon, but you’ll only hear Dr. Mathis and me in the clip that I’m sharing with this blog post).

Dr. Mathis and Mitch co-host the Team-Anywhere podcast. Virtual teams and remote work are the focus of this podcast. Remote work may be on your mind as well.

Leaders who never considered leading virtual teams are now faced with leading a more flexible workplace. This includes remote work—leading people, and managing the work they perform in their roles, who are not always working physically together with others each day of their work week.

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Leadership, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , , , , ,
How do you measure progress?
You’ve set your objective (Part I), defined what success and progress will look like (Part II), identified what will be hard (Part III), and brainstormed who and what can help minimize that hard stuff (Part IV).

Now it is time to define measurements, so you (and all) can know that the progress and success desired are on track, consider your best next action steps and then ask those who are part of this journey to choose the actions—the best next steps—they will take.

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Leadership, Measurement, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , ,
Who can help you make progress
In Part 1, I asked you to consider a strategic objective or significant goal and envision the future after successfully achieving it.

In Part II, you defined what progress would look like by prioritizing 1-4 nearer-term goals or objectives that would indicate you were moving in the right direction.

And in Part III, you identified and prioritized what would be hard, asking “what will likely challenge progress toward achieving key objectives?”

Now your best next step will be to consider: who and what can help? Specifically, who and what can help move over, under, around, or through what challenges your progress toward achieving key objectives?
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Leadership, Measurement, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , , , ,
In Part 1 your one best next step was to consider a strategic objective or significant goal and envision the future after successfully achieving it.

In Part II your best next step was to define what progress would look like. I recommended doing this by prioritizing 1-4 nearer-term goals or objectives that would indicate you were moving in the right direction.

Now your step will be to consider: what will be hard? This requires looking into the future when you’ve achieved your longer-term strategic objective, or 1-4 nearer-term objectives or goals that indicate progress. And it requires getting clear about “what is,” now. What will likely hinder progress?

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Leadership, Measurement, The Pivot & Aligned Momentum, Transformation & Strategy   , ,

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